Event Calendar

Sunday, July 1, 2018

All day
 
 
Before 1am
1am
2am
3am
4am
5am
6am
7am
8am
9am
10am
11am
12pm
1pm
2pm
3pm
4pm
5pm
6pm
7pm
8pm
9pm
10pm
11pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall, 4th Floor
Bagels and Coffee
Bagels and Coffee
Sunday, July 1, 2018 - 10:00am
Ceremonial Hall, 4th Floor

Join members and friends for bagels and coffee before our Sunday platform.

 
10:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall
Chorus Practice
Chorus Practice
Sunday, July 1, 2018 - 10:00am
Ceremonial Hall
Led by David Gracia and Pat Debrovner

Practice the songs we sing on Sunday mornings – and get some tips to improve our singing technique.

 
 
11:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Sunday Platform - Anne Klaeysen: Colloquy on Patriotism
Sunday Platform - Anne Klaeysen: Colloquy on Patriotism
Sunday, July 1, 2018 - 11:00am
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor

On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass gave a speech at an event commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence, held at Rochester's Corinthian Hall, in which he said, "This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn." And he asked them, "Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day?" During our shared reflection on patriotism, we will consider his question and what this document means to us today.

***

Independence Day on July 4th has been a federal holiday since 1941, but the tradition of celebrating “the birth of America” dates back to the 18th century and the American Revolution. On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence. On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass gave a speech at an event commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence, held at Rochester's Corinthian Hall, in which he said, "This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn." And he asked them, "Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day?" During our shared reflection on patriotism, we will consider his question and what this document means to us today.

Shared Charity: Encampment for Citizenship