Event Calendar

April 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
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6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)
Stoic School of Life: Stoicism, Telic vs. Atelic Activities, and the Meaning of Life
Stoic School of Life: Stoicism, Telic vs. Atelic Activities, and the Meaning of Life
Monday, April 1, 2019 -
6:00pm to 8:00pm
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)

What is the meaning of life? The ancients, and the Stoics in particular, had a lot to say about this. In this discussion we will explore the Stoic take on a distinction introduced by Aristotle, that between telic and atelic activities. A telic activity is one that has a particular end as the goal, like writing a book, or making a sports team. Once the goal is achieved, the activity is completed. An atelic activity, by contrast, finds its fulfillment in itself, like spending time with friends or family. There is no foreseeable end to such an activity. What combination of telic and atelic activities, then, makes for a good life?

Suggested reading: https://www.patreon.com/posts/stoicism-telic-21531368

Some of the ancient Stoics were vegetarians, but not all. Does Stoic philosophy entail vegetarianism, regardless of what individual Stoics may think or do?

More info: https://www.meetup.com/Stoic-School-of-Life/ and https://howtobeastoic.wordpress.com

Meeting dates subject to change.

 
 
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)
Exploring Ethical Dilemmas In: Medical Aid in Dying--Clinical and Ethical Perspectives w/ Terry M. Perlin, Ph.D.
Exploring Ethical Dilemmas In: Medical Aid in Dying--Clinical and Ethical Perspectives w/ Terry M. Perlin, Ph.D.
Monday, April 1, 2019 -
6:30pm to 8:00pm
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)

What does one do when there’s no clearly defined ethical road to take? This program features speakers from a variety of backgrounds — medicine, law, business, science, education, the arts, social work, etc. — who share their experience and knowledge of ethical issues in those fields. Monthly, 1st Monday. Monthly, 1st Monday.

Is it ethically appropriate to hasten death by medical means? Are legal and religious prohibitions important considerations? What can we learn from the experience of the several U.S.states that have legalized this "procedure" [e.g., Oregon, Washington, more recently California]? We shall look at cases in which moral decisions have been difficult. This discussion-based presentation will examine the underlying ethical issues at the end of life that should be addressed by individuals and their family/friends.

TERRY M . PERLIN, PH.D is Emeritus Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Resarch Fellow, Scripps Gerontology Center at Miami University [OH]. He served as a faculty member there from 1975-2008. He has held teaching and research positions at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; Wright State University School of Medicine; and as Visiting Professor, General Internal Medicine, at University of California, San Francisco.

For ten years Perlin was Ethics Consultant for the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB). Here in New York, he has served as Visiting Professor at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The author of CLINICAL MEDICAL ETHICS: CASES IN PRACTICE (Little, Brown and Co.), he is the author/editor of numerous books, articles, and review essays in both scientific and humanities journals.He has trained hospital ethics committees in case consultation since 1985.

 
 
5:30 PM to 8:30 PM
Adler Study (514)
Police Reform Organizing Project (PROP)
Police Reform Organizing Project (PROP)
Tuesday, April 2, 2019 -
5:30pm to 8:30pm
Adler Study (514)

Police Reform Organizing Project (PROP) works to expose and correct abusive police tactics that routinely and disproportionately do harm to our city’s low-income communities and people of color.

 
 
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Room 508
Wisdom and World Affairs
Wisdom and World Affairs
Tuesday, April 2, 2019 -
6:00pm to 8:00pm
Room 508

Every 1st and 3rd Tuesday with moderator Ken Gans.

Join for philosophical discussions focusing on today's headlines, covering a wide variety of subjects, including the fate of humanity, world affairs, humanism, and more.

Readings:

Beware The Mideast's Falling Pillars

Will Politicians Ever Protect Us from Guns?

Don't Make Healh Care a Purity Test

Trump and Conscience in the Age of Demagogues

Welcome to China's Xi, But Paris Remains Wary

 
 
6:30 PM
Ethical Culture as a Practice
Ethical Culture as a Practice
Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 6:30pm

Moderator: Dr. Richard Koral, Leader

Through readings, self-reflection and the sharing of relevant experiences, we will explore the meaning of the volunteer work that we do as it relates to our personal life journeys. It will be expected that each participant will engage in an ongoing volunteer project that provides some kind of service to the disadvantaged.

 
 
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Great Literature Discussion Group: The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro
Great Literature Discussion Group: The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro
Wednesday, April 3, 2019 -
7:00pm to 9:00pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

Gunther Tielemans, Moderator

This month: The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro

Read the novella in advance and be prepared to discuss the aspects of interest to you by referring to specific related text and reading it to the group.  Visit https://www.meetup.com/Great-Literature-Discussions/  to learn more about us.

Monthly, 1st Wednesday

Members Free, Guests $5

 
 
10:30 AM to 2:00 PM
Auditorium
21st Annual Gandhi–King Season for Nonviolence
21st Annual Gandhi–King Season for Nonviolence
Thursday, April 4, 2019 -
10:30am to 2:00pm
Auditorium

Reserve Your Free Tickets: www.GandhiKingSFN.com. First come, first served.
Questions/Requests for more info.: GandhiKingSFN@Gmail.com, (917)-727-MLK1

Presented by the Institute for International Leadership, Non-Violence, and Service.

The 21st Annual Gandhi-King Season of Nonviolence celebration will take place on Thursday, April 4th from 10:30 am – 2:00 pm at The New York Society for Ethical Culture, located at 2 West 64th Street, New York, NY. Featuring dynamic presentations and performances from student leaders from all across New York and New Jersey. Admission is FREE, ALL Ages, Groups and Individuals are welcome at this Annual Intergenerational Event, go to www.GandhiKingSFN.com to reserve seats!

The “Gandhi-King Season For Nonviolence” is a Global Annual Celebration of the philosophies and lives of Mahatma Mohandas Gandhi and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., designed to promote peace and honor their vision for an empowered, nonviolent world. It is a 64-day period spanning from January 30th (the day Mahatma Gandhi was assassinated 1948) through April 4th (the day Dr. King was assassinated in 1968).

The “Season for Nonviolence” launched in 1998 at the United Nations with substantive endorsements from the former UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan, the U.S. Ambassador to India, Vice President Al Gore, Coretta Scott King, and the Director General of UNESCO on behalf of its Culture of Peace and nonviolence appeal by the Nobel Peace Laureates. Since its inception, using an “omni-local” model of citizen empowerment, local organizing groups have participated with "Season For Nonviolence" in over 900 cities in 67 countries. Prominent Speakers at our events in New York have included Presidential Medal of Freedom Winner, Rev. Dr. C.T. Vivian, and Minnijean Brown Trickey and Terrance Roberts of the Historic Little Rock Nine.

This year’s event will include dynamic presentations and performances from Student Leaders from Vista Academy Middle School in East New York, Brooklyn, Youth from The City University of New York C.S.I. Liberty Partnerships Program, Rotary International Students from North Brunswick, Roselle Park, and Edison High Schools, Wadleigh High School for the Performing and Visual Arts in Manhattan, Mater Dei Prep High School of New Jersey’s Global Institute, and there will also be an Interactive Flags of the World Ceremony, singing, dancing and more!

 
 
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Leader Lunch Discussion
Leader Lunch Discussion
Thursday, April 4, 2019 -
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

Bring your lunch and join Dr. Anne Klaeysen for engaging conversation. Folders with relevant articles will be available from Maggie Determann in the Membership office.

Readings:

“Life on a Shrinking Planet” by Bill McKibben, The New Yorker, 11/26/18 (https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/11/26/how-extreme-weather-is-shrinking-the-planet)

 
 
7:00 PM to 9:30 PM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Ethics in Film: Idiocracy
Ethics in Film: Idiocracy
Friday, April 5, 2019 -
7:00pm to 9:30pm
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Our monthly film screening series, followed by a lively discussion of the ethical issues explored.

Post-film discussion led by Chris Everett

 
 
9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Social Hall
Brunch & Book Talk - Black is The Body: Stories From My Grandmother's Time, My Mother's Time, and Mine w/ Author Emily Bernard
Brunch & Book Talk - Black is The Body: Stories From My Grandmother's Time, My Mother's Time, and Mine w/ Author Emily Bernard
Saturday, April 6, 2019 -
9:00am to 1:00pm
Social Hall

Brunch - 9:00am-10:30am
Talk - 11:00am-1:00pm

Tickets and RSVP: https://blackisthebody-ethicalnyc.eventbrite.com

 "Blackness at its borders, where it meets whiteness in fear and hope, in anguish and love."

Hear Dr. Emily Bernard speak about her new, unflinchingly honest book, Black is The Body: Stories From My Grandmother's Time, My Mother's Time, and Mine.

An extraordinary, exquisitely written memoir (of sorts) that looks at race--in a fearless, penetrating, honest, true way--in twelve telltale, connected, deeply personal essays that explore, up-close, the complexities and paradoxes, the haunting memories and ambushing realities of growing up black in the South with a family name inherited from a white man, of getting a PhD from Yale, of marrying a white man from the North, of adopting two babies from Ethiopia, of teaching at a white college and living in America's New England today. From the acclaimed editor of Remember Me to Harlem: The Letters of Langston Hughes and Carl Van Vechten ("A major contribution," Henry Louis Gates; "Magnificent," Washington Post).

"I am black--and brown, too," writes Emily Bernard. "Brown is the body I was born into. Black is the body of the stories I tell."

And the storytelling, and the mystery of Bernard's storytelling, of getting to the truth, begins with a stabbing in a New England college town. Bernard writes how, when she was a graduate student at Yale, she walked into a coffee shop and, along with six other people, was randomly attacked by a stranger with a knife ("I remember making the decision not to let the oddness of this stranger bother me"). "I was not stabbed because I was black," she writes (the attacker was white), "but I have always viewed the violence I survived as a metaphor for the violent encounter that has generally characterized American race relations. There was no connection between us, yet we were suddenly and irreparably bound by a knife, an attachment that cost us both: him, his freedom; me, my wholeness."

Bernard explores how that bizarre act of violence set her free and unleashed the storyteller in her ("The equation of writing and regeneration is fundamental to black American experience").

She writes in Black Is the Body how each of the essays goes beyond a narrative of black innocence and white guilt, how each is anchored in a mystery, and how each sets out to discover a new way of telling the truth as the author has lived it. "Blackness is an art, not a science. It is a paradox: intangible and visceral; a situation and a story. It is the thread that connects these essays, but its significance as an experience emerges randomly, unpredictably . . . Race is the story of my life, and therefore black is the body of this book."

And what most interests Bernard is looking at "blackness at its borders, where it meets whiteness in fear and hope, in anguish and love."

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Emily Bernard was born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee. She holds a B. A. and Ph. D. in American Studies from Yale University. Her work has appeared in The American Scholar, The Boston Globe Magazine, Creative Nonfiction, Green Mountains Review, Oxtford American, Ploughshares, The New Republic, and The Atlantic. Her essays have been reprinted in Best American Essays, Best African American Essays, and Best of Creative Nonfiction. Her first book, Remember Me to Harlem: The Letters of Langston Hughes and Carl Van Vechten, was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She has received fellowships and grants from Yale University, Harvard University, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Vermont Arts Council, the Vermont Studio Center, and The MacDowell Colony. A contributing editor at The American Scholar, Emily is the Julian Lindsay Green and Gold Professor of English at the University of Vermont. She lives in South Burlington with her husband John, twin daughters Isabella & Giulia, Sammy the dog, a gentle giant, and Willie & Tom, two very interesting cats.

Visit her website at https://www.emilybernard.com/

Co-sponsored by the New York Society for Ethical Culture, Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture, Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island, Ethical Culture Society of Westchester, Riverdale-Yonkers Society for Ethical Culture, and the Ethical Culture Society of Bergen County.

 
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10:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall
Chorus Practice
Chorus Practice
Sunday, April 7, 2019 - 10:00am
Ceremonial Hall

Led by David Gracia and Pat Debrovner

Practice the songs we sing on Sunday mornings – and get some tips to improve your singing technique.

 
 
11:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Sunday Platform - Ken Jockers - Interconnectedness: Hudson Guild and the Modern Settlement House Movement
Sunday Platform - Ken Jockers - Interconnectedness: Hudson Guild and the Modern Settlement House Movement
Sunday, April 7, 2019 - 11:00am
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor

In conversation with Leader Anne Klaeysen, Ken will talk about the modern settlement house movement in New York City and its role in supporting and assisting vulnerable populations in our city. In the current political and cultural environment, settlement houses continue to provide bedrock services to people in need while simultaneously innovating to assist new immigrant populations, overcome systemic educational challenges and address intensifying problems with housing and employment. Specifically, Ken will talk about the programming and impact of Hudson Guild, which serves Chelsea and the west side of Manhattan and which has a long and important history with the Ethical Culture movement.

Ken Jockers is Executive Director of Hudson Guild, which provides bedrock social and human services to 14,000 people annually along the west side of Manhattan. Rooted in Chelsea, where one in six people still live in entrenched poverty and development has significantly transformed the community, Hudson Guild provides a path to stability and achievement for low income people. Early childhood education, college access, workforce readiness, engagement for older adults, mental health assistance, artmaking, food access and community education are all part Hudson Guild's portfolio, designed to produce individual success and neighborhood strength. Hudson Guild was featured in the recent HBO film, Class Divide.

Prior to Hudson Guild, Ken served in various capacities at community agencies in New York, and as a lawyer in the administrations of Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Manhattan Borough President Ruth Messinger. Ken holds a BA from Connecticut College and a JD from Brooklyn Law School.

Presider: Leader Anne Klaeysen

Shared Charity: Hudson Guild

 
 
11:00 AM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Young Ethical Explorers: Freethinking Children's Philosophy Club
Young Ethical Explorers: Freethinking Children's Philosophy Club
Sunday, April 7, 2019 - 11:00am
Elliott Library, Room 507

Join us every 1st Sunday for our Freethinking Children's Philosophy Club led by youth coordinator Audrey Kindred!

April's theme: Mother Earth

Children care about their fellow creatures on earth. This month YEE will explore the evolution and wellbeing of creatures on planet Earth. We will learn about some of humanity’s efforts to stand up for animals in the face of misunderstanding, mistreatment, and extinction.

***

Weekly Schedule (subject to change)

11am: Ceremonial Hall, 4th floor - Ethical's inclusive community gathers for greetings and music.

11:15am: Adults and teens may choose to stya for the Morning Meeting. Children will be led to Elliott Library on the 5th floor for an independent project of friendship, creativity, and deed.

12:30pm: Pick-up on the 5th floor or on the playground (6th floor) weather permitting.

Lunch & Social Hour (Cafeteria, 6th floor). Children and teens always eat free! Complimentary lunch for first-time newcomer parents/caregivers.

12:30-2pm Family playground time (6th floor), weather permitting.

Send RSVPs or inquiries to EthicsForChildren@nysec.org. For more information, visit YoungEthicalExplorers.blogspot.com.

 
 
12:45 PM
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
Lunch & Social Hour
Lunch & Social Hour
Sunday, April 7, 2019 - 12:45pm
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
 
 
 
 
 
 
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Tuesdays with TED Talks
Tuesdays with TED Talks
Tuesday, April 9, 2019 -
2:00pm to 3:30pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

Every 2nd Tuesday with Leader Anne Klaeysen and 4th Tuesday with Leadership Coordinator Maggie Determann.

Everyone Loves TED! It's even better when you can discuss the talks with other people. Together we will view selections with contemporary ethical themes and engage in a lively discussion. Links to the talks will be published on our website AFTER each session so that everyone will see them for the first time.

 
 
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Clone of Tuesdays with TED Talks
Clone of Tuesdays with TED Talks
Tuesday, April 9, 2019 -
2:00pm to 3:30pm
Elliott Library, Room 507
 
 
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Race, Systems, and Society
Race, Systems, and Society
Tuesday, April 9, 2019 -
6:30pm to 8:00pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

With Leader Dr. Richard Koral

Even among those who are mindful of the subtle racial, ethnic, and class distinctions that persist in society, we are all participants in a larger societal structure that perpetuates injustices. We will read and discuss books and articles that explore the features of systemic racism and classism in America to better understand the ways in which society can recreate itself to permit all people to flourish and thrive.

We'll be discussing Unfinished Business: Closing the Racial Achievement Gap in Our Schools By Pedro Noguera and Jean Wing (eds), a series of essays describing the experience in Berkley High School, a highly integrated school.

“Unfinished Business brings to light the hidden inequities of schools–where cultural attitudes, academic tracking, curricular access, and after-school activities serve as sorting mechanisms that set students on paths of success or failure.”

 
 
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Adler Study - Room 514
Classical Music Club: Beethoven's Violin Sonatas
Classical Music Club: Beethoven's Violin Sonatas
Wednesday, April 10, 2019 -
2:00pm to 3:30pm
Adler Study - Room 514

Monthly, 2nd Wednesdays!

This month, we'll enjoy and discuss Beethoven's violin sonatas.

Devotees of classical music are often intrigued by the nuances of different recordings of the same piece. Attendees are invited to bring more than one CD of the same musical composition -- under the baton of different conductors, virtuosos, or orchestras. We'll listen to them (or excerpts) and discuss our opinions about those differences.

Jack Oisher, Moderator

 
 
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Leader Lunch Discussion
Leader Lunch Discussion
Thursday, April 11, 2019 -
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

Bring your lunch and join Dr. Anne Klaeysen for engaging conversation. Folders with relevant articles will be available from Maggie Determann in the Membership office.

Readings:

“A Journey Into the Animal Mind” by Ross Anderson, The Atlantic, March 2019 (https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/03/what-the-crow-knows/580726/

 
 
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Challenges of Being a Good Human
Challenges of Being a Good Human
Thursday, April 11, 2019 -
6:30pm to 8:00pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

Moderator: Dr. Anne Klaeysen, Leader

Registration required. 2nd and 4th Thursdays, January-May. Syllabus and readings available from Margaret Determann.

Roman philosopher Lucius Anneaus Seneca (1 BCE - CE 65) wrote, "Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for a kindness." Centuries later, in 1770, French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (non de plume for François-Marie Arouet) quoted an Italian proverb: "The perfect is the enemy of the good." In this 10-session class, through readings, videos, and exercises, we will explore the nature and practice of goodness. Topics will include nonviolent communication, mindfulness, and forgiveness.

 
 
8:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Auditorium
American Indian Community House - Urban NDNS: A Celebration of Native American Music, Arts, and Culture
American Indian Community House - Urban NDNS: A Celebration of Native American Music, Arts, and Culture
Thursday, April 11, 2019 -
8:00pm to 10:00pm
Auditorium

Carnegie Hall’s Migrations: The Making of America Arts Festival Presents:

“Urban NDNS” A celebration of Native American music, arts, and culture

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/urban-ndns-tickets-51407053882

Info: https://aich.org/calendar-events/american-indian-community-house-present...

New York City is home to the largest populations of inter-tribal Native American, First Nations, and Indigenous individuals out of any urban city across Turtle Island (the United States). Some of us born here with family roots in New York and the areas surrounding Nations that go back for generations. Others of us coming to NYC to find what we couldn’t find anywhere else. Each one contributing to the rich and diverse culture that is the NYC “Urban NDNS” community. This is our story, and our song. This is our celebration.

Please join us as part of the NYC American Indian Community House 50th Anniversary celebration year!

 
 
6:30 PM to 9:30 PM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Ethics and the Theater: The Navigator by Eddie Antar
Ethics and the Theater: The Navigator by Eddie Antar
Friday, April 12, 2019 -
6:30pm to 9:30pm
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Come at 6:30 pm for a reception and after the reading participate in a discussion of the ethical issues of the play led by Betsy Ungar.
 
What if your GPS gave you directions not only to your destination but to your entire life? And every road you took was the right one? Eddie Antar's very funny (and a bit spooky) play explores just how great that would be. Or not.

 

 
 
7:00 PM
Auditorium
Concert - Dave Davies
Concert - Dave Davies
Friday, April 12, 2019 - 7:00pm
Auditorium
 
 
8:15 AM
Bull's Hill, Cold Spring, NY
Spring Hike 2019
Spring Hike 2019
Saturday, April 13, 2019 - 8:15am
Bull's Hill, Cold Spring, NY

Bull's Hill in historic Cold Spring, NY.

This 5-hour hike will take us to a summit over the Hudson River. You will be rewarded with stunning views of the river and, on a clear day, Manhattan. We will take a scenic train ride to the town of Cold Spring. The town, set on the east bank of Hudson, has many antique stores, nice coffee shops, several restaurants, and a lovely small park. This town is worth a day's visit even if you do not hike!

The ride on Metro North Hudson line takes an hour and twenty minutes and offers spectacular views of the river. We will meet at the information booth at Grand Central at 8:25 am. If you arrive after that time, find us on the train that leaves at 8:45am (Hudson Line, train to Poughkeepsie). The round trip ticket is $29 (off peak fare). Please buy your own tickets. Bring a water bottle, light lunch and/or snack for the trail, and a few dollars for a coffee stop at a local cafe. Wear hiking or sturdy walking shoes (there are some steep parts on decent), and dress in layers for the hike. Rain cancels.

 

 
 
1:00 PM
Social Hall
Big Apple Knitters Guild
Big Apple Knitters Guild
Saturday, April 13, 2019 - 1:00pm
Social Hall

Big Apple Knitters Guild General Meeting

This is a membership organization separate from NYSEC that sets its own yearly & event fees. For more information, visit: www.bakg.org

 
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9:30 AM
Room 508
Colloquy: Mother Earth
Colloquy: Mother Earth
Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 9:30am
Room 508

Colloquy is a long-standing discussion group and a mainstay for members to express their opinions on a great many subjects. The group meets at 9:30 on the 2nd Sunday of each month (except July and August).

Put Colloquy on your calendar and be part of the discussion!

Presider: Leader Dr. Anne Klaeysen

 
 
10:30 AM
Ceremonial Hall
Chorus Practice
Chorus Practice
Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 10:30am
Ceremonial Hall

Led by David Gracia and Pat Debrovner

Practice the songs we sing on Sunday mornings – and get some tips to improve your singing technique.

 
 
11:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Sunday Platform - Joe Chuman - Loving Our Neighbor and the World: Cosmopolitanism and the American Future
Sunday Platform - Joe Chuman - Loving Our Neighbor and the World: Cosmopolitanism and the American Future
Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 11:00am
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor

American society is stridently divided. There are those whose primary identities and loyalties are centered on communities which share their values -- ethnic, religious and political. Their dedications tend to be parochial and local. By contrast, many Americans profess broader loyalties. They are committed to others not of their own group and who are different from themselves - to minorities, and to strangers as well as those beyond their family and who hold to similar values.

In my address, Joe will explore different ways of framing American identity as we look toward the future. Joe will focus on the values of cosmopolitanism, which requires a global outlook but does discount the more immediate loyalties of family, neighborhood and to those like oneself. Joe will propose that cosmopolitanism promotes a vision which may enable us to get beyond the polarization which characterizes and plagues American society at this perilous moment.

Presider: Henryka Komanska

Shared Charity: NYC H20

 
 
11:00 AM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Young Ethical Explorers: Expressing Ethics Workshop
Young Ethical Explorers: Expressing Ethics Workshop
Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 11:00am
Elliott Library, Room 507

Join us every 2nd Sunday for our Expressing Ethics Workshop with Deepali Srivastava of Writefully Ours!

April's theme: Mother Earth

Children care about their fellow creatures on earth. This month YEE will explore the evolution and wellbeing of creatures on planet Earth. We will learn about some of humanity’s efforts to stand up for animals in the face of misunderstanding, mistreatment, and extinction.

***

Weekly Schedule (subject to change)

11am: Ceremonial Hall, 4th floor - Ethical's inclusive community gathers for greetings and music.

11:15am: Adults and teens may choose to stya for the Morning Meeting. Children will be led to Elliott Library on the 5th floor for an independent project of friendship, creativity, and deed.

12:30pm: Pick-up on the 5th floor or on the playground (6th floor) weather permitting.

Lunch & Social Hour (Cafeteria, 6th floor). Children and teens always eat free! Complimentary lunch for first-time newcomer parents/caregivers.

12:30-2pm Family playground time (6th floor), weather permitting.

Send RSVPs or inquiries to EthicsForChildren@nysec.org. For more information, visit YoungEthicalExplorers.blogspot.com.

 
 
12:45 PM
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
Lunch & Social Hour
Lunch & Social Hour
Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 12:45pm
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
 
 
 
 
 
1:30 PM
Adler Study, Room 514
Ethics in The News
Ethics in The News
Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 1:30pm
Adler Study, Room 514

Abe Markman presides

A lively give and take on compelling issues and events 

 
 
1:30 PM
Room 508
Ethical Death Café
Ethical Death Café
Sunday, April 14, 2019 - 1:30pm
Room 508

Moderator: Rev. Dr. Barbara Simpson Bereavement Program Community Outreach Coordinator at Caring Hospice Services

Two meetings monthly, 2nd Sunday and 4th Wednesday

Gather in a relaxed and safe setting to discuss death, drink tea and eat delicious cake. The objective is to increase awareness of death and help people make the most of their (finite) lives. Topics include heath care proxy, ethical wills, and green burial. 

 
 
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Ceremonial Hall, 4th Floor
Skye & Massimo's Philosophy Cafe: The Philosophy of Time
Skye & Massimo's Philosophy Cafe: The Philosophy of Time
Monday, April 15, 2019 -
6:00pm to 8:00pm
Ceremonial Hall, 4th Floor

The Café is run by philosophers Skye Cleary (http://tinyurl.com/yddu38tf) and Massimo Pigliucci (http://tinyurl.com/msm6d6u). It is based on the principle of the Socratic dialogue. Every meeting has a simple theme (e.g., should we be afraid of death? What's the ethics of eating?), which is introduced by Skye and Massimo on the basis of short, accessible, suggested (but not mandatory!) readings. The rest of the meeting then features an open discussion among participants, facilitated by Skye and Massimo, aiming at sharpening our thinking about whatever subject matter is being examined.

Time is money! Or is it? Metaphysically, what is time? What sense can we make of the concept, given the most current theories in fundamental physics? Ethically, how do we make the best use of our time, regardless of what precisely that is?

For more information, visit the Cafe's Meetup page: https://www.meetup.com/SkyeandMassimophilosophycafe

Meeting dates subject to change.

 
 
7:00 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Newcomers' Reception
Newcomers' Reception
Monday, April 15, 2019 - 7:00pm
Elliott Library, Room 507
 
Join Leader Anne Klaeysen, Membership Coordinator Maggie Determann and Society members for dessert, and to find out who we are and what we do! Ask about the Society and our philosophy, social ethics, programs and membership. Please RSVP by calling ext. 113 or at mdetermann@nysec.org
 
 
12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Lunch with The League of Women Voters: Another Hurricane Sandy? NYC’s Strategic Plan to Protect Residents Against Natural Disasters w/ Susanne DesRoches
Lunch with The League of Women Voters: Another Hurricane Sandy? NYC’s Strategic Plan to Protect Residents Against Natural Disasters w/ Susanne DesRoches
Tuesday, April 16, 2019 -
12:00pm to 2:00pm
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor

Join us for Lunch with The League of Women Voters, featuring a buffet lunch (12pm-1pm) followed by a program focusing on issues of concern to the League and to Ethical members alike, and usually includes a Q&A.

Speaker: Susanne DesRoches, Deputy Director, Infrastructure + Energy, NYC Mayor’s Office of Recovery + Resiliency and Office of Sustainability

Ms. DesRoches leads the City’s efforts to adapt infrastructure systems across the New York metro area to the risks of climate change. She oversees a team responsible for implementing a cohesive program of resiliency initiatives across several key areas, including energy, telecommunications, water/sewer/waste, and transportation in collaboration with the New York City Panel on Climate Change. Ms. DesRoches is an Adjunct Lecturer at Columbia University and received her Bachelor of Industrial Design from Pratt Institute and an MPA Environmental Science & Policy.

To RSVP, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/another-hurricane-sandy-nycs-strategic-plan-to-protect-residents-from-natural-disasters-tickets-59393943885 or contact LWV manager Emily: ecorvi@lwvnyc.org or 212-725-3541

 
 
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Room 508
Wisdom and World Affairs
Wisdom and World Affairs
Tuesday, April 16, 2019 -
6:00pm to 8:00pm
Room 508

Every 1st and 3rd Tuesday with moderator Ken Gans.

Join for philosophical discussions focusing on today's headlines, covering a wide variety of subjects, including the fate of humanity, world affairs, humanism, and more.

Readings:

A Green Real Deal, for Real Results Soon

Ravaging Fawaway Forests While Protecting Trees at Home

Winning The War on Poverty

A CEO Scared for His Country

Don't Make Health Care a Purity Test

How to Protect the Power of Diplomacy

 
 
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Leader's Office, Room 502
Camaraderie and Good Conversation on Issues Philosophical and Newsworthy
Camaraderie and Good Conversation on Issues Philosophical and Newsworthy
Tuesday, April 16, 2019 -
7:00pm to 8:30pm
Leader's Office, Room 502

with Leader Dr. Joseph Chuman.

This is a monthly discussion group focusing on contemporary issues and occasionally classical writings relating Ethical Culture and Humanism. We will primarily make use of articles from journals of opinion and book chapters when relevant. Rather than taking a merely journalistic approach, the discussions will aim to illuminate the philosophical concepts and values which underlie the issues being discussed.

Register to receive reading assignments in advance: please contact Maggie Determann at mdeterman@nysec.org or 212-874-5210 x 113.

 
 
10:30 AM
Lobby
Ethical Adventures: Walk Down Broadway
Ethical Adventures: Walk Down Broadway
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 - 10:30am
Lobby

The fifth in our series of walks tracing Broadway, top to bottom. This month, our starting point will be right here at Ethical. From there, we'll head south.

RSVP not required but requested. Hope you can join us. Email Bob Bumcrot (rbumcrot65@gmail.com) or Howard Rose (howardrose125@gmail.com) to RSVP, or just show up on time.

 
 
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)
Panel: Anti-Science & the Crisis of Contemporary Democracy
Panel: Anti-Science & the Crisis of Contemporary Democracy
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 -
7:00pm to 9:00pm
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)

An attack on science and reason is underway in modern societies. Join us for a conversation with authors of a new book on this important topic, ANTI-SCIENCE AND THE ASSAULT ON DEMOCRACY: Defending Reason in a Free Society. Learn about the threats that the rise of anti-science attitudes poses to democratic society.

Wine and cheese reception at 6:30pm ($5 donation suggested).

RSVP here: https://antiscience-ethicalnyc.eventbrite.com

Featuring:

Prof. Michael J. Thompson, William Paterson University
Gregory Smulewicz-Zucker, Rutgers University
Dr. Diana M. Judd, Ramapo College of New Jersey

Books will be available for purchase.

About the book:

Defending the role that science must play in democratic society--science defined not just in terms of technology but as a way of approaching problems and viewing the world. In this collection of original essays, experts in political science, the hard sciences, philosophy, history, and other disciplines examine contemporary anti-science trends, and make a strong case that respect for science is essential for a healthy democracy.

The editors note that a contradiction lies at the heart of modern society. On the one hand, we inhabit a world increasingly dominated by science and technology. On the other, opposition to science is prevalent in many forms--from arguments against the teaching of evolution and the denial of climate change to the promotion of alternative medicine and outlandish claims about the effects of vaccinations. Adding to this grass-roots hostility toward science are academics espousing postmodern relativism, which equates the methods of science with regimes of "power-knowledge."

While these cultural trends are sometimes marketed in the name of "democratic pluralism," the contributors contend that such views are actually destructive of a broader culture appropriate for a democratic society. This is especially true when facts are degraded as "fake news" and scientists are dismissed as elitists. Rather than enhancing the capacity for rational debate and critical discourse, the authors view such anti-science stances on either the right or the left as a return to premodern forms of subservience to authority and an unwillingness to submit beliefs to rational scrutiny.

Beyond critiquing attitudes hostile to science, the essays in this collection put forward a positive vision for how we might better articulate the relation between science and democracy and the benefits that accrue from cultivating this relationship.

 
 
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Leader Lunch Discussion
Leader Lunch Discussion
Thursday, April 18, 2019 -
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

Bring your lunch and join Dr. Anne Klaeysen for engaging conversation. Folders with relevant articles will be available from Maggie Determann in the Membership office.

Readings:

“How to Make Mountains” by Marcia Bjornerud, Aeon, 2/18/19 (https://aeon.co/essays/when-geology-left-solid-ground-how-mountains-came-to-be

 
 
7:00 PM to 9:30 PM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Jazz Cafe: Tamuz Nissim
Jazz Cafe: Tamuz Nissim
Friday, April 19, 2019 -
7:00pm to 9:30pm
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor

Following our featured artist is the Open Mic hour. Sign up to perform, sit back and enjoy, and get up and dance if the spirit moves you!

"Originals that are so smart they can bend light" -C. Michael Bailey, All About Jazz

" She has a beautiful voice, outstanding control, she can scat with the best of any era and on top of that, she tosses in some knock out vocalese that would -put the icing on any cake!" -Dave Rogers WTJU

"Miss Nissim’s instrument is gorgeous, lustrous, precise, high-sprung, and light as a feather-light. Her musicianship is fierce as she digs into the expression of each word, brings ceaseless variety soft dynamics and gives every phrase a lustrous grace..Tamuz Nissim is not only a singer of boundless promise she is already a great, full-fledged artist " -Raul da Gama, Jazz daGama

"Whenever Tamuz Nissim sings, you’re immediately transported to a magical place." -Nathalie Freson, UK Vibe

Tamuz Nissim, a New York jazz singer, composer, and pianist, is known as a “very charismatic artist” (BHMagazino), “a voice that caresses your soul” and “a proof that jazz is a living art and that stars are still being born” (Athens Digital), and “an extremely gifted jazz singer” -Third Ear, Israel

Raised in Tel Aviv, Tamuz grew up with the melodies of Billie Holiday and Sarah Vaughan, as well as Art Blakey, Mingus, Bill Evans, and The Modern Jazz Quartet. Tamuz brings a fresh, new breadth to New York’s jazz scene, with her international training in classic piano, voice, and composition, and extensive collaboration with jazz musicians in intimate clubs and jazz festivals across Amsterdam, the Hague, Riga, Athens, Tinos, and Atlanta. "This girl with the cat eyes and voice that caresses the soul is a proof that jazz is a living art and that stars are still being born." Linda Baseggio, Athens Digital

Tamuz settled permanently in New York City in 2015, where she performs as a band leader and a guest singer for live shows and studio recordings. Many of New York’s top flight musicians accompanied her at the Blue Note, Jazz Forum, Bar Thalia, and Cornelia Street Cafe.

Her latest album "Echo of a Heartbeat" received great reviews from the Jazz press. The CD charted on The JazzWeek charts and is being played in over a 100 radio stations around the USA, Canada, South America, Japan, Europe, Australia, and Israel.

Join Tamuz on an exciting musical journey of jazz originals and standards as she celebrates her debut at the Jazz Café at Ethical. See www.tamuzmusic.com for more information.

The Jazz Café is curated by John Wilmeth and Steph Walker. Music Director pianist John Wilmeth is a multi-instrumentalist with experience in many genres. He has worked with the likes of Jerry Garcia, Boz Scaggs, Al Jarreau, James Moody, and Jon Hendricks.  Open Mic Emcee Steph Walker is a singer of many genres, and a poet, and has performed at such popular jazz venues as Silvana’s, Flute Bar, The Metropolitan Room, and The Triad. 

The John Wilmeth Jazz Trio includes Dave Meade, renowned drummer/percussionist.  He has worked with a wide spectrum of artists and musicians, including Nancy Wilson, Keely Smith, and Tony award winning singers Leslie Uggams, Paulo Szot, and Diahann Carroll. Meade has toured with Aretha Franklin, The Mamas and the Papas, and the Arturo O’Farrill Afro Cuban Orchestra, to highlight a few.  Back in the day, Dave played nightly at the world-famous Rainbow Room.  Bassist Ratzo Harris, a Thelonious Monk Competition semi-finalist, has worked with such musicians as Les Paul, Charles Lloyd, and Betty Carter.  “Ratzo Harris plays bass that's living root and steel girder.” (blogcritics). 

 
 
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9:30 AM
Room 508
Poetry Reading Circle
Poetry Reading Circle
Sunday, April 21, 2019 - 9:30am
Room 508

Bring poems you like. Or, perhaps April’s National Poetry Month and Earth Day will inspire you!

Cheryl Gross Presides.

 
 
10:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall
Chorus Practice
Chorus Practice
Sunday, April 21, 2019 - 10:00am
Ceremonial Hall

Led by David Gracia and Pat Debrovner

Practice the songs we sing on Sunday mornings – and get some tips to improve your singing technique.

 
 
11:00 AM
Elliott Library, Room 507
CANCELLED - Young Ethical Explorers: Animating Ethics Workshop
CANCELLED - Young Ethical Explorers: Animating Ethics Workshop
Sunday, April 21, 2019 - 11:00am
Elliott Library, Room 507

NOTE: This week's program has been cancelled. We'll see you next week!

****

Join us every third Sunday for our Animating Ethics Workshop with Amy Reid!

April's theme: Mother Earth

Children care about their fellow creatures on earth. This month YEE will explore the evolution and wellbeing of creatures on planet Earth. We will learn about some of humanity’s efforts to stand up for animals in the face of misunderstanding, mistreatment, and extinction.

***

Weekly Schedule (subject to change)

11am: Ceremonial Hall, 4th floor - Ethical's inclusive community gathers for greetings and music.

11:15am: Adults and teens may choose to stya for the Morning Meeting. Children will be led to Elliott Library on the 5th floor for an independent project of friendship, creativity, and deed.

12:30pm: Pick-up on the 5th floor or on the playground (6th floor) weather permitting.

Lunch & Social Hour (Cafeteria, 6th floor). Children and teens always eat free! Complimentary lunch for first-time newcomer parents/caregivers.

12:30-2pm Family playground time (6th floor), weather permitting.

Send RSVPs or inquiries to EthicsForChildren@nysec.org. For more information, visit YoungEthicalExplorers.blogspot.com.

 
 
11:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Sunday Platform - The Dream Unfinished: "Music for Mother Earth" Panel and Performance
Sunday Platform - The Dream Unfinished: "Music for Mother Earth" Panel and Performance
Sunday, April 21, 2019 - 11:00am
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor

Bridging the work of composers and activists who hail from communities impacted by climate change, activist orchestra The Dream Unfinished presents Deep River, a 2019 series of events throughout New York City that use classical music as a platform for dialogue surrounding the under-appreciated intersection of climate and social justice. Kick off our season with us at our launch, hosted by the New York Society for Ethical Culture on April 21st, Earth Day Sunday.

About The Dream Unfinished:

The Dream Unfinished is an activist orchestra. Its mission is to use classical music as a platform to engage audiences in dialogues surrounding social and racial justice. Since 2015, The Dream Unfinished has staged performances throughout Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx and Queens, and partnered with organizations such as the Center for Constitutional Rights, Black Women's Blueprint, African American Policy Forum, and others. Past seasons have centered on police brutality, the #SayHerName movement, the school to prison pipeline, and the current immigration crisis. The Dream Unfinished has people of color in the orchestra, in the music, behind the scenes, and in the audiences. We are an orchestra that looks and sounds like New York City, and through music, explores pressing issues which are affecting our communities.

Panelists: Laura Kaminsky, Eun Lee, Kyle Walker, Emily Kalish

Program:

Harry Burleigh/Samuel Coleridge Taylor/Maud Powell - Deep River

Laura Kaminsky - undercurrent

Roberto Sierra - Sonata para violín y piano (2010) - I. Expresivo, IV. Rítmico

Bios

Laura Kaminsky, “one of the top 35 female composers in classical music” (The Washington Post), frequently addresses issues including sustainability, war, and human rights in her work. “Full of fire as well as ice, (she writes) in an idiom that contrasts dissonance and violence with tonal beauty and meditative reflection. It is strong stuff.” (American Record Guide) With co-librettists Mark Campbell and Kimberly Reed she has created the most widely-produced contemporary opera in the U.S., As One (2014), Some Light Emerges(Houston Grand Opera 2017), and the forthcoming Today It Rains(Opera Parallèle/American Opera Projects 2019). Upcoming: a Piano Quintet for Ursula Oppens and the Cassatt String Quartet; and with Reed, Postville, inspired by the unprecedented and devastating immigration raid there in 2008, for a consortium led by Santa Fe and San Francisco Operas. She is head of composition at the Conservatory of Music/SUNY Purchase.

As a teacher, musician and arts professional, Eun Lee has prioritized socially relevant musical experiences for audiences of all ages. From 2012 to 2016 Eun worked as a teaching artist throughout New York City, and since 2015 has worked as an administrator at institutions such as the Diller-Quaile School of Music and Orchestra of St. Luke’s. She currently serves as a Manager of Learning and Engagement Programs at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute. Eun is also the executive director of The Dream Unfinished, an Activist Orchestra, which she co-founded in 2014. She has been invited to speak on The Dream Unfinished at Chamber Music America, the Kennedy Center, Harvard University, and others.

Emily Kalish, violinist, is committed to bringing audiences thoughtful, imaginative and emotionally honest interpretations of the classical repertoire as well as exciting new works by 21st-century composers. She is a producer and performer for The Dream Unfinished, an activist orchestra which supports NYC-based civil rights organizations through concerts and presentations. She currently holds positions in the Binghamton Philharmonic and Hudson Valley Philharmonic. A dedicated teacher, she is on the faculty of Concordia Conservatory of Music. In 2016 she and James Bergin co-founded Williamstown Orchestra Workshop, an intensive summer workshop for children ages 8-16. Ms. Kalish holds a Bachelor’s degree from the Hartt School in Connecticut, where she studied with Dr. Katie Lansdale, and a Master’s from Manhattan School of Music, where she studied with Burton Kaplan.

Critically-acclaimed pianist Kyle P. Walker has been featured on WNYC, WQXR, NPR, and UNC-TV. Recent performances include his debut solo recital at Weill Hall at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Stern Auditorium at Carnegie Hall, The Tantaloona Cave of Australia, and the Lied Center of Kansas. Highlights of this season include concerto, chamber, and solo appearances with the Colour of Music Festival Orchestra, a Lincoln Center appearance alongside Miss America 2019, and a U.S. solo recital tour. He is currently touring a solo performance project entitled Bach to BlackNotes, which features the music of J.S. Bach juxtaposed with music of neglected composers who speak to issues of oppression and inequality. See and hear more of Kyle’s musicianship on Instagram @klassicalkyle and at www.kylewalkerpiano.com.

Presider: Leader Anne Klaeysen

Shared Charity: The Dream Unfinished

 
 
12:45 PM
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
Lunch & Social Hour
Lunch & Social Hour
Sunday, April 21, 2019 - 12:45pm
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
 
 
 
 
 
1:30 PM
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)
Film & Discussion: Color Adjustment by Marlon Riggs
Film & Discussion: Color Adjustment by Marlon Riggs
Sunday, April 21, 2019 - 1:30pm
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)

Our monthly social justice documentary and discussion series, every 3rd Sunday! Presented by the Ethical Action Committee.

Color Adjustment is the second documentary we are showing by Marlon Riggs (last month we saw Ethnic Notions) as part of an attempt to enable us to gain insight into how much subliminal racism in the media continues to influence our perceptions of race. Color Adjustments analyzes the evolutions of American television’s portraits of blacks from 1948 through 1988.

MARLON RIGGS was a black gay writer, filmmaker, and social activist who died in 1994 from Aids. The New Yorker magazine (2/11/2019), in writing about the retrospective of his work at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in February, said his films “are essays in the truest sense of the word – attempts at describing the world both metaphorically and actually.”

 
 
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)
Speaking of Science - Spectacularly Free: The Case for Conservation w/ Chris Ang
Speaking of Science - Spectacularly Free: The Case for Conservation w/ Chris Ang
Monday, April 22, 2019 -
6:30pm to 8:00pm
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)

Speaker: Chris Ang, nature, wildlife and conservation photographer

This photo essay and talk presents nature and wildlife as it should be — spectacular and free — un-rearranged by men. Chris, who is passionate about nature conservation, believes that animals, like children, are defenseless and can be easily exploited and even abused. While most humans have a natural affinity with children, that may not be the case with animals, especially those that have not been domesticated. Over the past 50 years, global wildlife populations have decreased by 60% in a period of “species annihilation.”The creatures we share this earth with are decreasing while we are increasing and encroaching into their habitats, breeding grounds, and food sources. Chris uses his photos “to increase awareness and empathy towards nature and its species, and to reveal their majesty.”

Christopher Ang is an award-winning, New York-based nature conservation photographer whose work reflects his travels to dozens of wildlife preserves and national parks around the world. Most recently his work was exhibited at the Soho Photo Gallery. Visit him on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/chrisangphoto/

 
 
12:30 PM to 2:30 PM
Room 508
The Joy of Personal Writing Workshop
The Joy of Personal Writing Workshop
Tuesday, April 23, 2019 -
12:30pm to 2:30pm
Room 508
 
NONFICTION WRITING WORKSHOP led by Elaine Berman Gurney.

Try your hand at personal NON-FICTION in a nine-week class led by Elaine Berman Gurney. You can belong to a supportive group of writers – some just starting and others more experienced – and learn basic and more advanced writing skills. ALL ARE WELCOME!

To register contact Maggie Determann at 212.874.5210, x113 or email her at mdetermann@nysec.org

Advance registration is required for the entire nine-week Tuesday afternoon term.

 
 
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Tuesdays with TED Talks
Tuesdays with TED Talks
Tuesday, April 23, 2019 -
2:00pm to 3:30pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

Every 2nd Tuesday with Leader Anne Klaeysen and 4th Tuesday with Leadership Coordinator Maggie Determann.

Everyone Loves TED! It's even better when you can discuss the talks with other people. Together we will view selections with contemporary ethical themes and engage in a lively discussion. Links to the talks will be published on our website AFTER each session so that everyone will see them for the first time.

https://www.ted.com/talks/steven_petrow_3_ways_to_practice_civility

https://www.ted.com/talks/anil_seth_how_your_brain_hallucinates_your_con...

https://www.ted.com/talks/michael_shermer_on_believing_strange_things

https://www.ted.com/talks/frans_de_waal_do_animals_have_morals

https://www.ted.com/talks/tony_buffington_why_do_cats_act_so_weird

 
 
2:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Room 508
Ethical Death Café
Ethical Death Café
Wednesday, April 24, 2019 -
2:30pm to 4:30pm
Room 508

Moderator: Rev. Dr. Barbara Simpson Bereavement Program Community Outreach Coordinator at Caring Hospice Services

Two meetings monthly, 2nd Sunday and 4th Wednesday

Gather in a relaxed and safe setting to discuss death, drink tea and eat delicious cake. The objective is to increase awareness of death and help people make the most of their (finite) lives. Topics include heath care proxy, ethical wills, and green burial. 

 
 
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Social Hall
350NYC Meeting
350NYC Meeting
Wednesday, April 24, 2019 -
7:00pm to 9:00pm
Social Hall
 
 
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Leader Lunch Discussion
Leader Lunch Discussion
Thursday, April 25, 2019 -
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

Bring your lunch and join Dr. Anne Klaeysen for engaging conversation. Folders with relevant articles will be available from Maggie Determann in the Membership office.

Readings:

“Bruno Latour, the Post-Truth Philosopher, Mounts a Defense of Science” by Ava Kofman, The NY Times Magazine, 10/25/18 (https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/25/magazine/bruno-latour-post-truth-philosopher-science.html

 
 
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Cancelled - Challenges of Being a Good Human
Cancelled - Challenges of Being a Good Human
Thursday, April 25, 2019 -
6:30pm to 8:00pm
Elliott Library, Room 507

Notice: This week's edition is cancelled.

Moderator: Dr. Anne Klaeysen, Leader

Registration required. 2nd and 4th Thursdays, January-May. Syllabus and readings available from Margaret Determann.

Roman philosopher Lucius Anneaus Seneca (1 BCE - CE 65) wrote, "Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for a kindness." Centuries later, in 1770, French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (non de plume for François-Marie Arouet) quoted an Italian proverb: "The perfect is the enemy of the good." In this 10-session class, through readings, videos, and exercises, we will explore the nature and practice of goodness. Topics will include nonviolent communication, mindfulness, and forgiveness.

 
 
6:30 PM to 8:30 PM
Room 508
The Joy of Personal Writing Workshop
The Joy of Personal Writing Workshop
Thursday, April 25, 2019 -
6:30pm to 8:30pm
Room 508
 
NONFICTION WRITING WORKSHOP led by Elaine Berman Gurney.

Try your hand at personal non-fiction in a nine-week class led by Elaine Berman Gurney. You can belong to a supportive group of writers – some just starting and others more experienced – and learn basic and more advanced writing skills. ALL ARE WELCOME!

To register contact Maggie Determann at 212.874.5210, x113 or email her at mdetermann@nysec.org

Advance registration is required for the entire nine-week Thursday evening term.

 
 
7:00 PM to 9:30 PM
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)
Happy Hour for Humanity
Happy Hour for Humanity
Friday, April 26, 2019 -
7:00pm to 9:30pm
Ceremonial Hall (4th Floor)

Every 4th Friday!

Many of us are young professionals working full-time jobs, some are starting and caring for families, and we're all living in what seems to be a state of survival trying to make it here in the tri-state area--but we're not alone! Although we lead busy lives, we know it's important to engage with others in our community to support, motivate, and challenge each other to be our best ethical selves.

Once a month, let's unite and make some time to meet over refreshments to discuss current ethical issues around the globe as well as ones we're facing locally. By sharing current events, short articles, videos, and personal narratives, let's break out of our daily routines to make a toast to humanity together.

 
 
7:00 PM
Auditorium
Concert - Roger McGuinn
Concert - Roger McGuinn
Saturday, April 27, 2019 - 7:00pm
Auditorium
 
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10:30 AM
Ceremonial Hall
Chorus Practice
Chorus Practice
Sunday, April 28, 2019 - 10:30am
Ceremonial Hall

Led by David Gracia and Pat Debrovner

Practice the songs we sing on Sunday mornings – and get some tips to improve your singing technique.

 
 
11:00 AM
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor
Sunday Platform - Curt Collier: The Biology of Political Conflicts
Sunday Platform - Curt Collier: The Biology of Political Conflicts
Sunday, April 28, 2019 - 11:00am
Ceremonial Hall - 4th floor

Recent work of noted evolutionary biologists suggest that what may drive our political conflicts may have less to do with ideas and more to do with deep-seated survival skills. Evidence for this is seen in field observations of species closely related to humans, but sociologists also spot this same behavior within humans as well. While biology drives most of human behavior, as is often the case, “biology is not destiny.” How can we ameliorate our biological drive towards conflicts with others, and might other biological drives be used to counter this challenge?

Curt Collier is the National Youth Programs Director for Groundwork USA, an organization created by the National Park Service and the EPA. He has created a number of award-winning programs that bring new audiences into the national parks and has created a number of career pipelines for youth of color to enter conservation related fields. Annually, Collier oversees corps and training programs in Yellowstone, Grand Teton, and Glacier National Parks, as well as youth programs in Gateway National Recreation Area in New York. He served as an Ethical Culture leader for over 20 years at Societies in St. Louis, Riverdale-Yonkers, and for the New York Society.

Presider: Monica Weiss

Shared Charity: Groundwork USA

 
 
11:00 AM
Elliott Library, Room 507
Young Ethical Explorers: Ethical Action Deed
Young Ethical Explorers: Ethical Action Deed
Sunday, April 28, 2019 - 11:00am
Elliott Library, Room 507

Join us every fourth Sunday for our Ethical Action Deed led by youth coordinator Audrey Kindred. This week's focus: "Standing up for Creatures."

April's theme: Mother Earth

Children care about their fellow creatures on earth. This month YEE will explore the evolution and wellbeing of creatures on planet Earth. We will learn about some of humanity’s efforts to stand up for animals in the face of misunderstanding, mistreatment, and extinction.

***

Weekly Schedule (subject to change)

11am: Ceremonial Hall, 4th floor - Ethical's inclusive community gathers for greetings and music.

11:15am: Adults and teens may choose to stya for the Morning Meeting. Children will be led to Elliott Library on the 5th floor for an independent project of friendship, creativity, and deed.

12:30pm: Pick-up on the 5th floor or on the playground (6th floor) weather permitting.

Lunch & Social Hour (Cafeteria, 6th floor). Children and teens always eat free! Complimentary lunch for first-time newcomer parents/caregivers.

12:30-2pm Family playground time (6th floor), weather permitting.

Send RSVPs or inquiries to EthicsForChildren@nysec.org. For more information, visit YoungEthicalExplorers.blogspot.com.

 
 
12:45 PM
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
Lunch & Social Hour
Lunch & Social Hour
Sunday, April 28, 2019 - 12:45pm
School Cafeteria, 6th Floor
 
 
 
 
 
1:30 PM
Adler Study (514)
Climate Chat w/ Environmental Stewardship Committee
Climate Chat w/ Environmental Stewardship Committee
Sunday, April 28, 2019 - 1:30pm
Adler Study (514)

with Monica Weiss and Vince Brancato, Co-Chairs of the Ethical NYC Environmental Stewardship Committee.

Learn about the fine work of our climate partners--350NYC, Food and Water Watch, and NYC Grassroots Alliance--are doing, and find out how you can be part of a global climate solution. Hear reports about projects and campaigns they are promoting, and get updates on ways to influence your neighbors, families, and communities to pursue more sustainable-living choices.

This week, we'll also be watching some thought-provoking videos!